Your ‘Best Before’ Date

By Joshua Clifton

I’ve always thought that we have an expiry date in the hospitality industry— where we finally throw in the towel and move on from the industry altogether — that one final straw with a customer pushing you over the edge, a staff member that didn’t turn up to their shift or simply dealing with the day to day unpredictable juggernaut that is the hospitality industry.

Is this just how it is in this industry or is it a reflection of the workforce overall?

I feel as if in our hospitality life we start strong, have our peak time of performance then slowly move in a downward spiral until we lose our shit, scream at a random customer and hang up the hat.

Sometimes we get out early; sometimes we stay past our best before date.

I think we all hit that proverbial ceiling where we say ‘enough is enough’. I often hear stories of people commenting that they got out of the industry years ago and never looked back.

Personally I’m a goal-orientated person. Put a target in front of me and I will commit to hitting it but I still have my days where I want to jump the counter and body slam the customer.

With all this being said, the question remains,

‘Is working day-to-day with customers, suppliers and our team pushing us over the edge faster than in other industries?’

How can we exercise resilience to push forward in the industry without breaking? Is there a method to the madness?


Flavour and Language

By James Henderson

Our finite arsenal of words attempts to convey a sensory experience, unique to the individual.

This collision of two abstract worlds magnifies communication error.

Despite the flexibility of language, it’s not robust enough to adapt to this personal and intimate envelopment of the senses.

Language is beautifully metamorphic and powerfully applicable but still bounded.

There are an incredible number of factors involved to effectively communicate flavour: idea conception, protocol knowledge (each party’s understanding of the chosen communication language), breadth and depth of flavour experience (and recall of such) and synthesis of protocol and recall to correctly articulate what the participant wants to — the choice of language matters.

How someone identifies themselves, could potentially influence their perception of the experience; their mood, the season, day and general temperament are all justifiably contributors to the retrospective experience.

Generally accepted terminology may reign supreme but it is in itself, another language — a subset of its parent, with altered linguistic relationships.

Understand language to — by definition — better articulate experience.

Language is paramount.

Without selecting words appropriately, reality may disappoint or fall short of its capacity to deliver — this differential is the ‘dead weight loss’ of language.

The story of flavour may be better than the flavour itself.


A Recipe For Change

By James Henderson

The hospitality environment we live in is diverging.

There are those who appreciate the in-person nature of our craft and those who would rather get their meal delivered to their couch. The shortest path to sustenance is cutting out the art of our industry and distilling it into a pure science, where robots serve for the purpose of meal delivery and patrons sit, undisturbed, on social media.

May we consider that technology, in all it’s magnificence, is in itself a tool — a powerful tool of humanity that must be harnessed appropriately — carefully applied.

I’m not suggesting we fear technology’s impact and ability to disrupt, but rather that we steer it in a direction that we’d like — a direction that proliferates more important ideas than those possessed by simple minds.

Without the influence of industry players who speak up and push for the appropriate change, technology will mutate our beautiful industry into a beast that we aren’t proud of.

There will be job losses. But they will reallocate.

There will be business closures. But new ones will rise in their place.

Be someone who supports the creation of a robust entity to balance Hedonism and longevity in an industry that flirts with myopia.